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All-Over-Printing Disclaimer

Due to our sublimation process, graphics may shift up to 2 inches when printed. Because of this, we do not recommend designs that require precise placement on all-over-printed apparel. Also, white streaks/creasing cannot be avoided with our sublimation process. These marks are most common under the arms of the garments and near stitching (sides, collars, shoulders, etc).

For additional information on this process, see here.

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Disclaimer about Direct to Garment

You may notice some discoloration or off white residue on your apparel. Do not worry! This is a special solution used for printing and can sometimes leave marks during the drying process. These are not stains and will wash off after the first wash cycle. Our apparel is created with the latest in garment printing technology. In addition, our inks are water based and eco-friendly. This makes the feel much softer than traditional screen printed shirts, but just as durable!

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My order shows it is being returned to sender, what now?

There are a few reasons an order can be returned to sender but most often it is due to an undeliverable address. Other instances include the package being unclaimed at customs or refused/returned by your end customer. You will receive notice once the order arrives back to our facility. We would advise contacting your end customer to determine how they would like to proceed and contact us with an updated address if you wish to have the product reshipped. New shipping charges will be applied for orders that have been unclaimed at customs, returned by your customer, or had an incorrect address originally provided.

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What happens if a package isn’t delivered to my customer, but the tracking states that it did?

T-Shirt Galore will cover a variety of courier errors such as lost or damaged in transit, postage due errors or generally misrouted packages when tracking provides no clear details or cause.

In the rare cases that a parcel is marked as delivered by the courier, but the recipient reports they have yet to receive it – T-Shirt Galore would not cover the cost of reshipping the order. Again, this only applies if the tracking details state that a delivery was made to the recipients address.

In most instances, it is found that the delivery was made, but left in an unexpected location at a recipient’s address. Recipients should reach out to the courier and inquire if any additional details were left by the delivery person – e.g. “left under table on back porch.”

If your customer is unable to locate the package you will need to place a new manual order to have it reshipped. If you’d like to file a claim with the courier for reimbursement, T-Shirt Galore customer support can assist you in this process – however, be mindful that claims through USPS or FedEx can often take several weeks before being resolved or refunded.

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What if the recipient’s address was wrong?

If the recipient’s address was wrong, then you are held responsible. Usually, the package is sent back to the return address. In the case that you’ve set the return address as your own, you can update the address and personally reship the order. If our address is set as the return address, then we’ll contact you for an updated address. However, the packages are sometimes not returned to the sender. In this case, you would have to process a new order to replace the original.

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In the case of returns, how do you handle the difference between a product quality problem (or, say, the wrong product shipped) vs. the customer changing his mind or wanting a different size?

Any returns or problems that occur because of an error on our part will be handled at our expense. Cases where your customer would like to exchange or return a product without any defect or due to a wrong size being ordered would be handled at your expense by placing a new order. If the item is returned to our facility, someone from our team will contact you regarding the return. We will ship the return back to you; however, you will be responsible for the shipping cost a second time. Unclaimed returns get donated to charity after 30 days.

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What if my content is from the public domain?

A work of authorship is in the “public domain” if it is no longer under copyright protection or if it failed to meet the requirements for copyright protection. Works in the public domain may be used freely without the permission of the former copyright owner. You should NOT presume that material is in the public domain without verifying it with an attorney or other reputable source. You should also NOT presume that material publicly available on private or commercial websites is not protected by copyright.

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What is fair use?

“Fair use” is a portion of copyright law that can allow the unauthorized use of another’s original copyrighted work for criticism, commentary, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. In the court of law the term “fair” is determined by four main factors:

The purpose and character of a use.
The nature of a copyrighted work.
The amount and substantiality of the portion of the work used.
The effect upon the copyright holder’s potential market for the work.

Fair use is applicable in defense of many works, but still has murky aspects that can present difficult scenarios for even expert analysts. Seeking legal counsel with an attorney before using materials that you know to be copyrighted is advised, even if you believe your content to be “fair use”. One way to evaluate whether a use is “fair” is to consider your own reaction if someone used your work without permission.

If in doubt, assume any unlicensed use is not a fair use. Fair use of an image for commercial purposes is treated differently than use for informative purposes or commentary. In general, a claim of fair use of an image on merchandise may not hold up in court, especially if the merchandise is sold for profit.

For more information on copyright visit the United States Copyright Office at http://www.copyright.gov and the federal law on copyrights (U.S.C. Title 17)http://www.access.gpo.gov/uscode/uscmain.html.

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Is it ok to use an image I found on the Internet?

Simply because an image is found on the Internet does not mean that it is in the public domain or available for commercial use on merchandise. You should assume that you cannot use the image unless its author has explicitly granted you a license to use it or it is in the public domain. Further, a person who posts an image on the Internet and claims that you are free to use it may not have had the right to post the image in the first place. Thus, your use of the image may violate the rights of the actual copyright owner.